Doug Earl

You can now access your project data programmatically, via a secure REST API. Read on for a quick overview, then head over to to learn the details.

What’s an API?

An API lets you access your project items from another program. Currently our API is read-only, meaning you can retrieve items, but you can’t change them or add new ones. Some of the things you might do using the API include integrating with other applications, analyzing your project to create a custom dashboard, or retrieving comments made by people you’ve shared your project with.

WordCloudExample Application

We built a sample that accesses all the items in a project and creates an animated word cloud showing the words used most often. You can try it out on your own project at Follow the directions there to create an API key that you’ll need on the Word Cloud page.

We’re in Beta

Please let us know if you have comments or questions. Even if you’re just dabbling with the API, we’d love to hear what type of application you have in mind and what improvements we could make that would help you out.

posted 10 Jan 2014 under Features

Archive Your Projects

Doug Earl

You can now archive your projects. When you hover your mouse over a project on the projects list page, an archive button will appear:


Just click the button and the project will be archived, making it inaccessible to you as well as anyone TReqswho has a share-link to the project. Should anyone click on a link to an archived project, they’ll be greeted by our friendly T-Reqs mascot letting them know that the project has gone extinct.

Accidentally delete the wrong project? No worries; when you click the archive button, you are immediately given the option to undo.  Or, if you decide later on that you want the project back, you can unarchive it from your account page. In addition, if you upload the project again from CaseComplete, it will automatically be unarchived.

posted 13 Jun 2013 under

UI Overhaul

Matt Terski

Over the past few weeks our designer, Ryan, has been hard at work changing the templates that drive all of the pages you see on We had a few goals in mind when we started on this project.

NewProjectUIFirst, we stepped back and took a fresh look at all the pages on the site. We were devoting too much space to things that didn’t provide information (the large logo and header at the top of each page, for example). There were also some UI elements that were a bit half-baked that made it into our first release. If we’d waited to perfect everything, we still wouldn’t have released.

We also listened to some feedback and considered how you are using the site. We tried to make it easier for you to navigate – especially when you are working with multiple projects.

Anyhow, we expect to keep on refining the UI until we’re completely happy with it (which will never happen – we’ll always be trying to improve it). Let us know what you think.

posted 12 Oct 2012 under Features

Can Everything be a Top Priority?

Doug Earl

At many points during your project, you'll need to answer some tough questions: We can’t implement all of these use cases, so which ones are top priority? Which of these UI wireframes is best? Which requirements can we defer until later? Our latest feature lets you poll your stakeholders to get their opinions on these questions and more.

Creating a Poll

Let’s dive right in to see how it works. From the Polls page, click the New Poll button and give it a name:


Once you’ve created the poll, you’ll be be able to Add Items and Edit the poll:


Click the edit button to to set the question that voters should answer.  Phrase the question as if there were only two choices (you’ll understand why later on), and be specific.  For example, “Which use case is more important to have in release 1.0?”. Keep in mind that you can use polls to gather all sorts of project metrics, not just priority.  For example:

  • A poll for developers that asks, “Which use case would take longer to implement?”. You’ll get a rough estimate for complexity that can aid in project scheduling and estimation.
  • A poll for Business Analysts that asks, “Which use case is easier to understand?”.  It might be the case that the lower ranking use cases could use some rewriting or refactoring to aid comprehension when you present them to your developers or end users.
  • A poll for your QA team that asks, “Which requirement is more difficult to test?”.  You might want to set up test harnesses for those requirements right away.

After setting the question, click Add Items to select the items you want people to vote on. Choose a small subset of your items – this will make it easier on your voters (more on that later).

Starting the Poll

Now you’re ready to start the poll. The standard sharing mechanism is used to give voters access, even if they don’t have an account.  When you click Start, a private URL will be generated that you give to your voters. They just need to follow that link to start voting:



So now is a good time to step back for a minute to describe the voting technique. We wanted voting to be fun, easy to understand, and easy to use on a mobile device. We considered many approaches such as ranking, a points system, and grouping.  And in fact, we may eventually implement all of those ideas, but for our first technique, we chose a “duel” approach, or “dueling requirements” if you will (cue music).  Here’s how it works: two items will be shown side-by-side. The voter simply picks which one best answers the question.  Then another pair of items will be presented and so on, until all possible pairings have been voted upon:


Two great things about this approach…First, voters only need to consider two items at a time, greatly simplifying their decision. No time is spent trying to make nuanced decisions, for example if a particular use case is a medium or medium-high priority.  And second, voters are forced to make a decision – there’s no way to mark everything as high priority despite their desire to do so.

It’s probably clear now why I said it’s best to keep your polls small. The number of pairings grows quickly as you add items to the poll. For example, a 10 item poll will have 45 pairings. A lot to be sure, but keep in mind that voters don’t have to vote in one sitting, and they can use their mobile device to vote anywhere and anytime, such as during commutes on the train, or in the dentist’s waiting room.

Poll Results

Poll results are displayed in a graph that shows the percentage of duels each item has won:


This data is most useful as guidance and to spur further discussion; it shouldn’t be used to make decisions for you.  For example, from the graph above it’s a pretty safe bet that creating a loan account is higher priority than evaluating a loan application, but it gets a little fuzzy in the middle.  And if all your items are closely ranked, then it’s a good indicator that your project stakeholders have a lot of competing interests and cutting a particular feature will surely disappoint someone!

Try it out!

Want to give it a try? Try our sample just-for-fun poll so you can see firsthand how it works. You can check the results any time if you’re curious to know how the poll turns out.

As I mentioned earlier, this is just the first polling approach that we have planned.  Does your organization have a favorite voting technique that you’d like to see us implement?  If so, let us know!

posted 1 Feb 2012 under Features

Share Link Expirations and Passwords

Matt Terski

One of the big ideas behind is the ability to share your requirements with others in a really low-friction way. It should take just a click or two and the recipient should be able to see what you’re sharing with the click of a link – whether they’re using a computer, phone, or tablet.

ShareButtonYou can share whatever you happen to be viewing: a use case, a diagram, a list of requirements, etc. To share something, just click the share button.

We had to balance the goal of simple sharing with the need to keep your requirements reasonably secure. One way we did this was to have the links expire automatically in three days. This frees you from having to remember to disable the link and, if the link would eventually make it into the wild, it would become invalid quickly.

New: Expirations and Passwords

We did a few things to make the share link feature more useful. A three day expiration seems reasonable, but might not be what you want in all cases. You might want to give your stakeholders a week or a month to look at what you’re sharing. Or you might decide to revoke access to the link immediately. You can now do this by editing the share link after you create it:


When you edit the link, you’ll not only be able to change its expiration, but you can assign it a password, too. Anybody who clicks the link will be asked for the password before they can click through.


Finally, as Doug pointed out in the previous post, when a viewer follows your share link, they’ll be able to browse to other items in the same project, but not items outside of the project. So you can set up different projects for different groups (e.g. customers) and they’ll be limited to viewing only items in the project that you sent them.

I’m pretty excited about what we’ve done with sharing so far and I hope we’re striking the right balance between security and ease of use. Let me know what you think. Upload a project and share a link, then let me know what you think of the experience. What’s missing?

posted 11 Oct 2011 under Features

A Couple New Features

Doug Earl

Just a quick note on a couple new features that you may not have noticed yet.

ProjectSelectionYou can now upload multiple projects to your account. Once you have multiple projects uploaded, you choose which items to view by selecting the desired project in the menu bar. When you share items for review, reviewers will only be able to see items in the project you’ve selected. This means you can upload projects for multiple clients and be assured that client A won't have access to client B's project. You’ll need CaseComplete version 6.0.4253 or later in order to take advantage of this feature.


We also introduced search capability last week. As with most web search engines, an item will be included in the results if it contains any of the search terms. For example, searching on loan application will display use cases and requirements that contain loan or application, with priority given to items that contain both terms. And, as you might expect, searching for “loan application” with quotes shows only those items that contain the exact phrase.

Looking ahead, we’re currently implementing a ranking mechanism, for example to get stakeholder feedback as to which use cases are most important to them.  If your organization has a favorite ranking or voting technique, we’d love to hear about it.

posted 4 Oct 2011 under Features

What’s new? (in your project)

Doug Earl

Last week I wrote about how you can view and compare versions of your requirements and use cases. But how can you find out which items have changed without looking at each one individually? Yesterday we released a feature that allows you to do just that.

We’ve added a Frequently Changed section to the Items page which shows the 5 items with the most updates. This lets you see the “hot spots” in your project, those requirements and use cases with the most churn. At the bottom of this list, there is a link to view all changes.

Frequently Changed section on Item page

The resulting page shows the changes made to your project, organized by date. Currently it shows when an item has changed or been added, and soon, we’ll also show deletions. When you click on an item, it will use the aforementioned comparison feature to highlight the changes made to the item on that date.

View all changes

We think this will be a pretty useful feature, but as always we’d like to hear what you think, especially regarding your anticipated use of  Will you upload your project frequently and ask for reviews often?  If so, the change history will let your reviewers focus on the items that changed since their last review. Or, will you upload just once in a while, where nearly every item in the project has changed? Then perhaps the change history won’t be so useful, since each date will essentially be a list of your entire project.  So beta testers, what do you think?  Please let us know.

If you haven’t uploaded your project recently, go ahead and upload it again and see what’s new!

posted 1 Jul 2011 under Features

View and Compare Versions

Doug Earl

You’ve probably noticed the History section when viewing your use cases and requirements.  But until you upload your project multiple times, you won't see its full capability. So let’s take a quick look at this feature so you can see what it’s all about.

Each time you upload your project from CaseComplete into, items that have any changes since the previous upload will get a new entry in the history section.  For example, here’s the history for a use case that’s been updated 4 times:


You can click on a date to view the the use case as it was on that particular date.  You can also click on a check box to see the differences between the version you’re currently viewing (denoted by the arrow) and the version you select via the check box. You’ll see highlighted text denoting changes between the two versions.  For example:


Here you can see that the name of the use case changed, some text was deleted, (red strikethrough text), and some text was added (green text). And because a step was added, the extension numbers changed.

We hope you’ll find this to be a useful feature.  Give it a try and let us know what you think!

posted 21 Jun 2011 under Features

Getting Started with Beta

Doug Earl

Thanks for trying out the beta edition of!  Here’s what you’ll need to do to get started:

  1. Create an account:
  2. Make sure you have the most recent version of CaseComplete 2011.  You can get the latest via Tools / Check for Updates.
  3. Enable the publish feature in CaseComplete: On the Tools tab, press and hold Ctrl+Shift, then click on any open area in the ribbon bar:


    A button labeled Publish to Web will appear:
    Note that you’ll only need to perform this step once, and after we’ve officially launched, you won’t need to do it all.
  4. Open a project you’d like to upload and click the Publish to Web button.  Provide the email and password you used in step 1.

That’s it.  You’re ready to start browsing your project in  Here are a few things you’ll want to try:

  • Filter items by their tags
  • Share a link with co-workers
  • Have co-workers add comments
  • Version tracking (by making changes in CaseComplete and republishing your project).

We’re eager to hear your feedback.  Keep in mind this is beta software, so if you encounter any problems or have ideas for features or improvements, please send them our way.  You’ll find this feedback link on many of the pages of the site, so feel free to send suggestions as you think of them.

posted 24 May 2011 under